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Biodiesel Bulletin


The Biodiesel Bulletin is published monthly by the National Biodiesel Board (NBB).




May 1, 2017  
Biodiesel Industry Focuses on America First

Earth Day Celebrations Focus on Reduced Emissions

Illinois B20 Club Committed to Biodiesel

Biodiesel Industry Provides Jobs for Communities Nationwide

Iowa Biodiesel Working Harder Than Ever

Biodiesel Helps Farmers Find Relief

UConn Goes Green with Biodiesel

 

 
Biodiesel Industry Focuses on America First

On April 13, the U.S. Commerce Department announced that it is formally initiating antidumping and countervailing duty investigations of biodiesel imports from Argentina and Indonesia. This decision follows a petition that was filed on behalf of the National Biodiesel Board Fair Trade Coalition, which is made up of the National Biodiesel Board and U.S. biodiesel producers. 

The coalition first filed an antidumping and countervailing duty petition on March 23, making the case that Argentine and Indonesian companies are violating trade laws by flooding the U.S. market with dumped and subsidized biodiesel.

“The National Biodiesel Board and U.S. biodiesel industry is committed to fair trade, and we support the right of producers and workers to compete on a level playing field,” said NBB CEO Donnell Rehagen. “This is a simple case where companies in Argentina and Indonesia are getting advantages that cheat U.S. trade laws and are counter to fair competition. NBB is involved because U.S. biodiesel production, which supports thousands of American jobs, is being put at risk by unfair market practices.”

Because of illegal trade activities, biodiesel imports from Argentina and Indonesia surged by 464 percent from 2014 to 2016. That growth has taken 18.3 percentage points of market share from U.S. manufacturers. Adding that market share back to American made biodiesel will only help to expand the economic impact of $11.42 billion that US biodiesel already provides.

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 Earth Day Celebrations Focus on Reduced Emissions

The world joined together on April 22 to celebrate Earth Day and to find ways to help preserve the planet. First celebrated in 1970 and based on the concept of world peace, Earth Day has grown into an annual celebration with events held worldwide to demonstrate support for environmental protection.

New York City is one of many across the country who celebrated Earth Day, this year by hosting a Car Free Day. Several major streets around the city and downtown area were closed to traffic, encouraging people to use public transportation, bikes, or walk, in an effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The city also runs its public busses and thousands of city fleet vehicles year-round on cleaner burning biodiesel to reduce emissions and help protect the environment.

Biodiesel is already doing its part to help across the country. In fact, last year biodiesel and renewable diesel reduced carbon pollution by 24.7 million metric tons, the equivalent of planting 641 million trees. That is nearly 80 percent less lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions than petroleum diesel.

In addition to reducing emissions, biodiesel also helps the nation’s food supply. One gallon of biodiesel cannot be produced without co-producing 30lbs of protein and 22lbs of carbohydrates and dietary fiber to help sustain healthy populations. More biodiesel simply means more food for American consumers.

The earth is something that needs to be preserved for future generations, and biodiesel is doing its part to help.

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Illinois B20 Club Committed to Biodiesel

As the biodiesel market experiences record growth, members of the Illinois B20 Club are committed to spreading the message. The state’s B20 club exists as a checkoff funded partnership between the Illinois Soybean Association and the American Lung Association in Illinois. Their mission is to raise the profiles of top fleets in Illinois that use blends of 20 percent biodiesel in their engines. Municipalities, school bus fleets, and over-the-road trucking companies are a few organizations that make up the club’s membership.

The members’ commitment to the club shows a dedication to biodiesel as an efficient cost-saving fuel that is also good for the environment. A strong peer-support program is also in place for current members to counsel other fleet managers and decision makers who are considering B20.

The American Lung Association in Illinois estimates that these members alone use 5.5 million gallons of B20 biodiesel per year in 4,809 vehicles. This amount of petroleum diesel replacement reduces particulate matter by 5,506 pounds and carbon dioxide emissions equal to planting 230,149 trees per year.

And these strides are not void of recognition. At its annual Biodiesel Conference and Expo, the National Biodiesel Board awarded Illinois’ B20 club with the prestigious 2017 Industry Partnership Award.

According to NBB, U.S. biodiesel and renewable diesel consumers reduced carbon emissions by 24.7 million metric tons in 2016, which is the equivalent of removing 3.8 million cars from the road. There’s no doubt that the environmental impact of biodiesel is reaching farther than ever before, and with the help of the Illinois B20 club, these record numbers will continue to soar.

 

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Biodiesel Industry Provides Jobs for Communities Nationwide

Throughout the country, everyday citizens are working in great careers all thanks to America’s Advanced Biofuel.

Brad Wilson, president and general manager of Western Iowa Energy, is just one of the thousands of jobs supported by the industry nationwide. An accountant by trade, Wilson spent several years as a financial auditor, mainly auditing grain cooperatives. He became president and general manager of the facility in Wall Lake, Iowa, in 2016.

“It’s gratifying to me knowing that we provide green jobs with good pay in a community that benefits greatly from the economic development that brings,” Wilson said. “Our workers in turn support the schools and local housing market, among other things. Our plant also contributes to other businesses in the area, from family farms, to truckers, to the railway.”

Western Iowa Energy is a multi-feedstock plant that recently expanded from 30 million gallons per year to 45 million gallons per year. The plant employs 30 people, many with young families, in the town of about 800 residents.

The biodiesel industry is working to provide great, stable careers to thousands of American citizens. From small towns like Wall Lake, to big cities, biodiesel is giving back to communities from coast to coast.

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Iowa Biodiesel Working Harder Than Ever

In a recent report, Iowa’s Department of Revenue reported that, in 2016 alone, 344.8 million gallons of on-road biodiesel blends were sold. These biodiesel sales replaced 54.7 percent of total reported on-road diesel sales.

“These milestones at the retail level show that Iowa’s progressive biofuels policies are working as intended to increase production and consumption,” said Grant Kimberley, Iowa Biodiesel Board executive director. “This industry is a powerful economic driver, benefiting the rural economy and consumers alike.”

The state is about halfway to the legislature’s 2006 goal of reaching 25 percent biodiesel replacement in Iowa retail motor fuel sales by 2020.

“Iowa’s biofuel producers need state tax credits to stay in place now more than ever to remain competitive,” Kimberley added. “The states with the most proactive, comprehensive policies will reap the greatest economic benefits of biofuels.”

Biodiesel policy in Iowa currently includes a 2 cent per gallon biodiesel producer incentive, a 4.5 cent retailer credit per gallon of B5, a state fuel tax exemption of 3 cents per gallon of B11 and higher, as well as infrastructure grants. With these policies in place, Iowa biodiesel production has risen to a record 305 million gallons that support 3,800 full-time jobs.

“Strong state policies encourage production to remain in Iowa, benefiting our economy and Iowa’s biofuels leadership position,” Kimberly concluded.

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 Biodiesel Helps Farmers Find Relief

Last month brought devastation to farmers and rural areas in the state of Kansas as wildfires raged across two counties, killing six people and forcing thousands to evacuate. As the fires subsided, farmers from across the country reached out to offer relief.

Illinois farmer Lynn Rohrscheib of Rohrscheib farms helped lead a convoy of biodiesel powered semis on a road trip from Illinois to Kansas. Eighteen farmers loaded their trucks with bales of hay, feed, and other supplies to bring to complete strangers who were affected by the wildfires.

“This livestock that’s left, they don’t have anything to eat, and they’re not going to survive without any kind of help,” Rohrscheib said. “As a farmer yourself, you just want to do something.”

Farmers from states like Michigan, Minnesota, and many others also offered help to wildfire victims. Rohrscheib emphasized that all of this was a group effort.

“I think by the time you count all the families, individuals, and different business, there were over 200 people involved in this convoy to make it possible.”

As a soybean farmer and United Soybean Board director, Rohrscheib counts on biodiesel made from soy oil to run her equipment, and America’s Advanced Biofuel fueled the trucks that helped bring much-needed support to fellow farmers in their time of need.

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UConn Goes Green with Biodiesel

A university dining hall might not be the first place that comes to mind when thinking about biodiesel, but at the University of Connecticut, transforming leftover frying oil into biodiesel is an important component of their Green Restaurant certification—a designation all eight campus dining halls have recently achieved.

To receive Green Restaurant certification, each dining hall was required to meet standards related to water and energy conservation, food waste reduction, recycling and more. UConn Dining Services took huge steps to become environmentally friendly such as contracting a biodiesel producer to recycle their used cooking oil. According to the Green Restaurant Association, restaurants cannot be certified unless their used cooking oil is made into biodiesel fuel.

“Achieving Green Restaurant certification for all of our eight residential dining facilities was an important goal for us,” said Dennis Pierce, UConn’s Director of Dining Services. “The environment is a community to which we belong rather than a commodity to be used. For these reasons, there were no choices but to achieve green certification.”

Due to the amount of oil used, UConn Dining Services went through a bidding process to find the best company to process it into clean biodiesel. Pierce said that making the transition to recycle into biodiesel has helped the Dining Services find a great use for their leftover oil, as well as providing a renewable energy resource that releases lower levels of carbon dioxide when it is burned.

The University of Connecticut hopes their example will lead other universities and restaurants to strive to achieve a Green Restaurant certification by creating clean, renewable biodiesel.

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For the latest issue of Biodiesel Magazine click here.

 

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